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facilitators

Differentiate between Educators and Trainers

Lecturer   

A lecture (from the French ‘lecture’, meaning ‘reading’ [process]) is an oral presentation intended to present information or teach people about a particular subject, for example by a university or college teacher. Lectures are used to convey critical information, history, background, theories, and equations. Usually the lecturer will stand at the front of the room and recite information relevant to the lecture’s content.

Teacher   

Teacher takes charge of the learning environment. The teacher is responsible for creating lesson plans that direct the course of study students follow. Clear and concise objectives delineate what the student learns on any given day. The teacher is responsible for measuring how much information the student learns. Evaluation is often in the form of tests, but the teacher may use other measurement tools to determine if the student met the teacher’s learning objectives.

Presenter    

Presentations can be of various types, depending on whether the presentation is intended to:

  • Sell
  • Inform
  • Motivate
  • Persuade
  • Advocate
  • Persuade
  • Entertain
  • Educate

Facilitator 

Facilitators might not be subject area experts. They do have special training in group dynamics, using processes such as conflict resolution, strategic planning and team building. In any group setting, a facilitator can quickly determine what the group knows so the group can proceed to build on that knowledge. By asking questions and keeping the group focused, a facilitator helps the group establish a set of ground rules, as well as its own learning objectives. The facilitator also helps the group evaluate what group members learned from their activities.

Trainer  

Students/learners come to the occasion prepared or expecting to learn. In addition, a trainer has more knowledge than the audience on the given topic. For example, someone who teaches an advanced Excel class should have more skill than those who come to class to learn.

Differentiate between Educators and Trainers

Lecturer   

A lecture (from the French ‘lecture’, meaning ‘reading’ [process]) is an oral presentation intended to present information or teach people about a particular subject, for example by a university or college teacher. Lectures are used to convey critical information, history, background, theories, and equations. Usually the lecturer will stand at the front of the room and recite information relevant to the lecture’s content.

Teacher   

Teacher takes charge of the learning environment. The teacher is responsible for creating lesson plans that direct the course of study students follow. Clear and concise objectives delineate what the student learns on any given day. The teacher is responsible for measuring how much information the student learns. Evaluation is often in the form of tests, but the teacher may use other measurement tools to determine if the student met the teacher’s learning objectives.

Presenter    

Presentations can be of various types, depending on whether the presentation is intended to:

  • Sell
  • Inform
  • Motivate
  • Persuade
  • Advocate
  • Persuade
  • Entertain
  • Educate

Facilitator 

Facilitators might not be subject area experts. They do have special training in group dynamics, using processes such as conflict resolution, strategic planning and team building. In any group setting, a facilitator can quickly determine what the group knows so the group can proceed to build on that knowledge. By asking questions and keeping the group focused, a facilitator helps the group establish a set of ground rules, as well as its own learning objectives. The facilitator also helps the group evaluate what group members learned from their activities.

Trainer  

Students/learners come to the occasion prepared or expecting to learn. In addition, a trainer has more knowledge than the audience on the given topic. For example, someone who teaches an advanced Excel class should have more skill than those who come to class to learn.

Differentiate between Educators and Trainers

Lecturer   

A lecture (from the French ‘lecture’, meaning ‘reading’ [process]) is an oral presentation intended to present information or teach people about a particular subject, for example by a university or college teacher. Lectures are used to convey critical information, history, background, theories, and equations. Usually the lecturer will stand at the front of the room and recite information relevant to the lecture’s content.

Teacher   

Teacher takes charge of the learning environment. The teacher is responsible for creating lesson plans that direct the course of study students follow. Clear and concise objectives delineate what the student learns on any given day. The teacher is responsible for measuring how much information the student learns. Evaluation is often in the form of tests, but the teacher may use other measurement tools to determine if the student met the teacher’s learning objectives.

Presenter    

Presentations can be of various types, depending on whether the presentation is intended to:

  • Sell
  • Inform
  • Motivate
  • Persuade
  • Advocate
  • Persuade
  • Entertain
  • Educate

Facilitator 

Facilitators might not be subject area experts. They do have special training in group dynamics, using processes such as conflict resolution, strategic planning and team building. In any group setting, a facilitator can quickly determine what the group knows so the group can proceed to build on that knowledge. By asking questions and keeping the group focused, a facilitator helps the group establish a set of ground rules, as well as its own learning objectives. The facilitator also helps the group evaluate what group members learned from their activities.

Trainer  

Students/learners come to the occasion prepared or expecting to learn. In addition, a trainer has more knowledge than the audience on the given topic. For example, someone who teaches an advanced Excel class should have more skill than those who come to class to learn.

Differentiate between Educators and Trainers

Lecturer   

A lecture (from the French ‘lecture’, meaning ‘reading’ [process]) is an oral presentation intended to present information or teach people about a particular subject, for example by a university or college teacher. Lectures are used to convey critical information, history, background, theories, and equations. Usually the lecturer will stand at the front of the room and recite information relevant to the lecture’s content.

Teacher   

Teacher takes charge of the learning environment. The teacher is responsible for creating lesson plans that direct the course of study students follow. Clear and concise objectives delineate what the student learns on any given day. The teacher is responsible for measuring how much information the student learns. Evaluation is often in the form of tests, but the teacher may use other measurement tools to determine if the student met the teacher’s learning objectives.

Presenter    

Presentations can be of various types, depending on whether the presentation is intended to:

  • Sell
  • Inform
  • Motivate
  • Persuade
  • Advocate
  • Persuade
  • Entertain
  • Educate

Facilitator 

Facilitators might not be subject area experts. They do have special training in group dynamics, using processes such as conflict resolution, strategic planning and team building. In any group setting, a facilitator can quickly determine what the group knows so the group can proceed to build on that knowledge. By asking questions and keeping the group focused, a facilitator helps the group establish a set of ground rules, as well as its own learning objectives. The facilitator also helps the group evaluate what group members learned from their activities.

Trainer  

Students/learners come to the occasion prepared or expecting to learn. In addition, a trainer has more knowledge than the audience on the given topic. For example, someone who teaches an advanced Excel class should have more skill than those who come to class to learn.

Differentiate between Educators and Trainers

Lecturer   

A lecture (from the French ‘lecture’, meaning ‘reading’ [process]) is an oral presentation intended to present information or teach people about a particular subject, for example by a university or college teacher. Lectures are used to convey critical information, history, background, theories, and equations. Usually the lecturer will stand at the front of the room and recite information relevant to the lecture’s content.

Teacher   

Teacher takes charge of the learning environment. The teacher is responsible for creating lesson plans that direct the course of study students follow. Clear and concise objectives delineate what the student learns on any given day. The teacher is responsible for measuring how much information the student learns. Evaluation is often in the form of tests, but the teacher may use other measurement tools to determine if the student met the teacher’s learning objectives.

Presenter    

Presentations can be of various types, depending on whether the presentation is intended to:

  • Sell
  • Inform
  • Motivate
  • Persuade
  • Advocate
  • Persuade
  • Entertain
  • Educate

Facilitator 

Facilitators might not be subject area experts. They do have special training in group dynamics, using processes such as conflict resolution, strategic planning and team building. In any group setting, a facilitator can quickly determine what the group knows so the group can proceed to build on that knowledge. By asking questions and keeping the group focused, a facilitator helps the group establish a set of ground rules, as well as its own learning objectives. The facilitator also helps the group evaluate what group members learned from their activities.

Trainer  

Students/learners come to the occasion prepared or expecting to learn. In addition, a trainer has more knowledge than the audience on the given topic. For example, someone who teaches an advanced Excel class should have more skill than those who come to class to learn.

Differentiate between Educators and Trainers

Lecturer   

A lecture (from the French ‘lecture’, meaning ‘reading’ [process]) is an oral presentation intended to present information or teach people about a particular subject, for example by a university or college teacher. Lectures are used to convey critical information, history, background, theories, and equations. Usually the lecturer will stand at the front of the room and recite information relevant to the lecture’s content.

Teacher   

Teacher takes charge of the learning environment. The teacher is responsible for creating lesson plans that direct the course of study students follow. Clear and concise objectives delineate what the student learns on any given day. The teacher is responsible for measuring how much information the student learns. Evaluation is often in the form of tests, but the teacher may use other measurement tools to determine if the student met the teacher’s learning objectives.

Presenter    

Presentations can be of various types, depending on whether the presentation is intended to:

  • Sell
  • Inform
  • Motivate
  • Persuade
  • Advocate
  • Persuade
  • Entertain
  • Educate

Facilitator 

Facilitators might not be subject area experts. They do have special training in group dynamics, using processes such as conflict resolution, strategic planning and team building. In any group setting, a facilitator can quickly determine what the group knows so the group can proceed to build on that knowledge. By asking questions and keeping the group focused, a facilitator helps the group establish a set of ground rules, as well as its own learning objectives. The facilitator also helps the group evaluate what group members learned from their activities.

Trainer  

Students/learners come to the occasion prepared or expecting to learn. In addition, a trainer has more knowledge than the audience on the given topic. For example, someone who teaches an advanced Excel class should have more skill than those who come to class to learn.

Differentiate between Educators and Trainers

Lecturer   

A lecture (from the French ‘lecture’, meaning ‘reading’ [process]) is an oral presentation intended to present information or teach people about a particular subject, for example by a university or college teacher. Lectures are used to convey critical information, history, background, theories, and equations. Usually the lecturer will stand at the front of the room and recite information relevant to the lecture’s content.

Teacher   

Teacher takes charge of the learning environment. The teacher is responsible for creating lesson plans that direct the course of study students follow. Clear and concise objectives delineate what the student learns on any given day. The teacher is responsible for measuring how much information the student learns. Evaluation is often in the form of tests, but the teacher may use other measurement tools to determine if the student met the teacher’s learning objectives.

Presenter    

Presentations can be of various types, depending on whether the presentation is intended to:

  • Sell
  • Inform
  • Motivate
  • Persuade
  • Advocate
  • Persuade
  • Entertain
  • Educate

Facilitator 

Facilitators might not be subject area experts. They do have special training in group dynamics, using processes such as conflict resolution, strategic planning and team building. In any group setting, a facilitator can quickly determine what the group knows so the group can proceed to build on that knowledge. By asking questions and keeping the group focused, a facilitator helps the group establish a set of ground rules, as well as its own learning objectives. The facilitator also helps the group evaluate what group members learned from their activities.

Trainer  

Students/learners come to the occasion prepared or expecting to learn. In addition, a trainer has more knowledge than the audience on the given topic. For example, someone who teaches an advanced Excel class should have more skill than those who come to class to learn.

Good facilitators share common characteristics

1. Be prepared
2. Have clear objectives and goals
3. Clarify meeting expectations
4. Allow participants to learn from one another
5. Expect participants to be engaged
6. Enforce positive and respectful interaction
7. Summarize and clarify difficult content or discussions
8. Ask open-ended questions and listen carefully
9. Be aware of pacing; keep an eye on the clock; keep it moving
10. Clarify with examples but don’t overuse stories
11. Be positive, enthusiastic, and focused
12. Trust your participants to have good ideas
13. Maintain a balance of content and process
14. Include a variety of activities
15. Offer encouragement, praise, and recognition
16. Be sure that your content has a beginning, middle, and end.
17. Gear your material for your audience—challenge them
18. Understand that people like to learn in different ways
19. Have a sense of closure or a call to action
20. Solicit “real” evaluations
21. Solicit ideas, new perspectives, and fresh points of view.
22. Encourage constructive differences of opinion
23. Keep participation balanced
24. Park or table topics that will derail the focus of the session
25. Get agreement on group actions
26.Work toward consensus whenever possible
27. Pay attention to participant reactions, moods, and attentiveness.
28. Listen, listen, listen

Facilitators We Dread

We have all been to workshops or meetings run by poor facilitators. But some facilitators can drive us nuts. When you encounter one of the bad facilitator types listed below, you know you are in for a long day.

    The Drill Sergeant—The facilitator who is rigidly stuck on the agenda and puts the clock above content
    The Guardian—The facilitator who makes certain that all conversation goes through him or her and not from participant to participant
    The Know-it-all –The facilitator who always has the answer. The know-it-all can’t say “I don’t know.”
    The Ice Cube—The distant and aloof facilitator who is unwilling to personalize the experience
    The Blabber—The facilitator who loves the sound of his or her own voice.
    The Pretender—The facilitator who doesn’t ask real questions but only “pretense questions” that are really designed to give the facilitator an excuse to pontificate.
    The “I Can’t Hear You” Guy—The facilitator who refuses to listen.
    The Marathon Man—The facilitator who piles activities on top of one another, doesn’t allow for breaks, and ignores the need for groups to reflect on a topic or idea
    The Parrot—The facilitator who relentlessly recaps information, restates ideas, and summarizes the obvious
    The Molasses Man—The facilitator who is painfully slow and doesn’t have a feel for pacing, variety, or style
    The Passenger—The facilitator who lets people talk too long and gives up the reins of facilitation,
    The Storyteller–-The facilitator who tells far too many cutesy stories and never really gets to the content.
    The Centerpiece—The facilitator who makes himself or herself the real content of the workshop
    The Tunnel Driver—The facilitator who keeps doing the same thing hour after hour