explaining

Proposal for the New National Skills Development Strategy (NSDS) and Sector Education and Training Authorities (SETAs) landscape

“Proposal for the New National Skills Development Strategy (NSDS) and Sector Education and Training Authorities (SETAs) landscape within the context of an Integrated and Differentiated Post-School Education and Training System (NSLP-2015)”

The DHET – Department of Higher Education and Training has called for public comments on the future of skills development in South Africa. Minister Blade Nzimande has released his proposals for the Setas and members of the public and interested organisations have until 20th January 2016 to submit their comments.

The proposals is that the Setas would be renamed and re-purposed so that they would become departments of the national Department of Higher Education and Training and renamed as Sector Education and Training Advisory Boards. It is also proposted that instead of their current 5-year life spans as determined by the relevant Minister, the proposal is that these Setabs (!) would be permanent structures.

This new move could suggest that DHET have more power over the SETA’s having questions over the future role of SAQA and the QCTO. One of the other major benefits for DHET would be to have more control over the Skills Levies Fund that could result in major issues for the private sector including skills training on lower levels, also the future of private FET colleges and Training Providers.

During 2013 with the amendment of the Skills Act the allocation of funds to levy paying organisations was reduced from 60% to 20% that resulted in an estimated 40% drop in training statistics between the SETA’s in South Africa. This year, DHET excluded annual training statistics from the different SETA’s in the DHET annual report. Why? Is this part of a cover-up process or a simple strategic move to change the allocation of the Skills Levies Fund to other priorities.

Another change in the 2013 Skills Development Act allowed the DHET to allocate more funds paid by the private sector to Universities and FET’s. Would this last move from DHET mean that Skills Development South Africa especially in the private sector would come to a total stand-still?

Readers can download a copy of this document below.

2015-SDA-Proposals

 

 

 

Proposal for the New National Skills Development Strategy (NSDS) and Sector Education and Training Authorities (SETAs) landscape

“Proposal for the New National Skills Development Strategy (NSDS) and Sector Education and Training Authorities (SETAs) landscape within the context of an Integrated and Differentiated Post-School Education and Training System (NSLP-2015)”

The DHET – Department of Higher Education and Training has called for public comments on the future of skills development in South Africa. Minister Blade Nzimande has released his proposals for the Setas and members of the public and interested organisations have until 20th January 2016 to submit their comments.

The proposals is that the Setas would be renamed and re-purposed so that they would become departments of the national Department of Higher Education and Training and renamed as Sector Education and Training Advisory Boards. It is also proposted that instead of their current 5-year life spans as determined by the relevant Minister, the proposal is that these Setabs (!) would be permanent structures.

This new move could suggest that DHET have more power over the SETA’s having questions over the future role of SAQA and the QCTO. One of the other major benefits for DHET would be to have more control over the Skills Levies Fund that could result in major issues for the private sector including skills training on lower levels, also the future of private FET colleges and Training Providers.

During 2013 with the amendment of the Skills Act the allocation of funds to levy paying organisations was reduced from 60% to 20% that resulted in an estimated 40% drop in training statistics between the SETA’s in South Africa. This year, DHET excluded annual training statistics from the different SETA’s in the DHET annual report. Why? Is this part of a cover-up process or a simple strategic move to change the allocation of the Skills Levies Fund to other priorities.

Another change in the 2013 Skills Development Act allowed the DHET to allocate more funds paid by the private sector to Universities and FET’s. Would this last move from DHET mean that Skills Development South Africa especially in the private sector would come to a total stand-still?

Readers can download a copy of this document below.

2015-SDA-Proposals

 

 

 

Proposal for the New National Skills Development Strategy (NSDS) and Sector Education and Training Authorities (SETAs) landscape

“Proposal for the New National Skills Development Strategy (NSDS) and Sector Education and Training Authorities (SETAs) landscape within the context of an Integrated and Differentiated Post-School Education and Training System (NSLP-2015)”

The DHET – Department of Higher Education and Training has called for public comments on the future of skills development in South Africa. Minister Blade Nzimande has released his proposals for the Setas and members of the public and interested organisations have until 20th January 2016 to submit their comments.

The proposals is that the Setas would be renamed and re-purposed so that they would become departments of the national Department of Higher Education and Training and renamed as Sector Education and Training Advisory Boards. It is also proposted that instead of their current 5-year life spans as determined by the relevant Minister, the proposal is that these Setabs (!) would be permanent structures.

This new move could suggest that DHET have more power over the SETA’s having questions over the future role of SAQA and the QCTO. One of the other major benefits for DHET would be to have more control over the Skills Levies Fund that could result in major issues for the private sector including skills training on lower levels, also the future of private FET colleges and Training Providers.

During 2013 with the amendment of the Skills Act the allocation of funds to levy paying organisations was reduced from 60% to 20% that resulted in an estimated 40% drop in training statistics between the SETA’s in South Africa. This year, DHET excluded annual training statistics from the different SETA’s in the DHET annual report. Why? Is this part of a cover-up process or a simple strategic move to change the allocation of the Skills Levies Fund to other priorities.

Another change in the 2013 Skills Development Act allowed the DHET to allocate more funds paid by the private sector to Universities and FET’s. Would this last move from DHET mean that Skills Development South Africa especially in the private sector would come to a total stand-still?

Readers can download a copy of this document below.

2015-SDA-Proposals

 

 

 

Proposal for the New National Skills Development Strategy (NSDS) and Sector Education and Training Authorities (SETAs) landscape

“Proposal for the New National Skills Development Strategy (NSDS) and Sector Education and Training Authorities (SETAs) landscape within the context of an Integrated and Differentiated Post-School Education and Training System (NSLP-2015)”

The DHET – Department of Higher Education and Training has called for public comments on the future of skills development in South Africa. Minister Blade Nzimande has released his proposals for the Setas and members of the public and interested organisations have until 20th January 2016 to submit their comments.

The proposals is that the Setas would be renamed and re-purposed so that they would become departments of the national Department of Higher Education and Training and renamed as Sector Education and Training Advisory Boards. It is also proposted that instead of their current 5-year life spans as determined by the relevant Minister, the proposal is that these Setabs (!) would be permanent structures.

This new move could suggest that DHET have more power over the SETA’s having questions over the future role of SAQA and the QCTO. One of the other major benefits for DHET would be to have more control over the Skills Levies Fund that could result in major issues for the private sector including skills training on lower levels, also the future of private FET colleges and Training Providers.

During 2013 with the amendment of the Skills Act the allocation of funds to levy paying organisations was reduced from 60% to 20% that resulted in an estimated 40% drop in training statistics between the SETA’s in South Africa. This year, DHET excluded annual training statistics from the different SETA’s in the DHET annual report. Why? Is this part of a cover-up process or a simple strategic move to change the allocation of the Skills Levies Fund to other priorities.

Another change in the 2013 Skills Development Act allowed the DHET to allocate more funds paid by the private sector to Universities and FET’s. Would this last move from DHET mean that Skills Development South Africa especially in the private sector would come to a total stand-still?

Readers can download a copy of this document below.

2015-SDA-Proposals

 

 

 

Proposal for the New National Skills Development Strategy (NSDS) and Sector Education and Training Authorities (SETAs) landscape

“Proposal for the New National Skills Development Strategy (NSDS) and Sector Education and Training Authorities (SETAs) landscape within the context of an Integrated and Differentiated Post-School Education and Training System (NSLP-2015)”

The DHET – Department of Higher Education and Training has called for public comments on the future of skills development in South Africa. Minister Blade Nzimande has released his proposals for the Setas and members of the public and interested organisations have until 20th January 2016 to submit their comments.

The proposals is that the Setas would be renamed and re-purposed so that they would become departments of the national Department of Higher Education and Training and renamed as Sector Education and Training Advisory Boards. It is also proposted that instead of their current 5-year life spans as determined by the relevant Minister, the proposal is that these Setabs (!) would be permanent structures.

This new move could suggest that DHET have more power over the SETA’s having questions over the future role of SAQA and the QCTO. One of the other major benefits for DHET would be to have more control over the Skills Levies Fund that could result in major issues for the private sector including skills training on lower levels, also the future of private FET colleges and Training Providers.

During 2013 with the amendment of the Skills Act the allocation of funds to levy paying organisations was reduced from 60% to 20% that resulted in an estimated 40% drop in training statistics between the SETA’s in South Africa. This year, DHET excluded annual training statistics from the different SETA’s in the DHET annual report. Why? Is this part of a cover-up process or a simple strategic move to change the allocation of the Skills Levies Fund to other priorities.

Another change in the 2013 Skills Development Act allowed the DHET to allocate more funds paid by the private sector to Universities and FET’s. Would this last move from DHET mean that Skills Development South Africa especially in the private sector would come to a total stand-still?

Readers can download a copy of this document below.

2015-SDA-Proposals

 

 

 

Proposal for the New National Skills Development Strategy (NSDS) and Sector Education and Training Authorities (SETAs) landscape

“Proposal for the New National Skills Development Strategy (NSDS) and Sector Education and Training Authorities (SETAs) landscape within the context of an Integrated and Differentiated Post-School Education and Training System (NSLP-2015)”

The DHET – Department of Higher Education and Training has called for public comments on the future of skills development in South Africa. Minister Blade Nzimande has released his proposals for the Setas and members of the public and interested organisations have until 20th January 2016 to submit their comments.

The proposals is that the Setas would be renamed and re-purposed so that they would become departments of the national Department of Higher Education and Training and renamed as Sector Education and Training Advisory Boards. It is also proposted that instead of their current 5-year life spans as determined by the relevant Minister, the proposal is that these Setabs (!) would be permanent structures.

This new move could suggest that DHET have more power over the SETA’s having questions over the future role of SAQA and the QCTO. One of the other major benefits for DHET would be to have more control over the Skills Levies Fund that could result in major issues for the private sector including skills training on lower levels, also the future of private FET colleges and Training Providers.

During 2013 with the amendment of the Skills Act the allocation of funds to levy paying organisations was reduced from 60% to 20% that resulted in an estimated 40% drop in training statistics between the SETA’s in South Africa. This year, DHET excluded annual training statistics from the different SETA’s in the DHET annual report. Why? Is this part of a cover-up process or a simple strategic move to change the allocation of the Skills Levies Fund to other priorities.

Another change in the 2013 Skills Development Act allowed the DHET to allocate more funds paid by the private sector to Universities and FET’s. Would this last move from DHET mean that Skills Development South Africa especially in the private sector would come to a total stand-still?

Readers can download a copy of this document below.

2015-SDA-Proposals

 

 

 

Proposal for the New National Skills Development Strategy (NSDS) and Sector Education and Training Authorities (SETAs) landscape

“Proposal for the New National Skills Development Strategy (NSDS) and Sector Education and Training Authorities (SETAs) landscape within the context of an Integrated and Differentiated Post-School Education and Training System (NSLP-2015)”

The DHET – Department of Higher Education and Training has called for public comments on the future of skills development in South Africa. Minister Blade Nzimande has released his proposals for the Setas and members of the public and interested organisations have until 20th January 2016 to submit their comments.

The proposals is that the Setas would be renamed and re-purposed so that they would become departments of the national Department of Higher Education and Training and renamed as Sector Education and Training Advisory Boards. It is also proposted that instead of their current 5-year life spans as determined by the relevant Minister, the proposal is that these Setabs (!) would be permanent structures.

This new move could suggest that DHET have more power over the SETA’s having questions over the future role of SAQA and the QCTO. One of the other major benefits for DHET would be to have more control over the Skills Levies Fund that could result in major issues for the private sector including skills training on lower levels, also the future of private FET colleges and Training Providers.

During 2013 with the amendment of the Skills Act the allocation of funds to levy paying organisations was reduced from 60% to 20% that resulted in an estimated 40% drop in training statistics between the SETA’s in South Africa. This year, DHET excluded annual training statistics from the different SETA’s in the DHET annual report. Why? Is this part of a cover-up process or a simple strategic move to change the allocation of the Skills Levies Fund to other priorities.

Another change in the 2013 Skills Development Act allowed the DHET to allocate more funds paid by the private sector to Universities and FET’s. Would this last move from DHET mean that Skills Development South Africa especially in the private sector would come to a total stand-still?

Readers can download a copy of this document below.

2015-SDA-Proposals

 

 

 

Explaining Accreditation?

To become accredited:

Firstly you need to understand the word Accredited. Click here!

Explaining the different types of accreditation.

1)      Freelancers and Qualified Staff

2)      Become an Accredited Training Provider

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1.Freelancers and Qualified Staff.

  • To be able to facilitate any programme you must have the US 117871 “Train the Trainer” Certificate (at least NQF 5 level) approved through the ETDP SETA.
  • To be able to assess any learner (with seta work) you must have the US 115753 “Conduct Assessments” Certificate  (at least NQF 5 level) approved through the ETDP SETA.
  • To be able to moderate assessments you must have US 115753 + US 115759 “Conduct Moderation” Certificate (at least NQF 6 level) approved through the ETDP SETA.
  • You must have “scope” to train, assess or moderate any person. (Scope = two to three years practical experience or a certificate or higher in the specific field)
  • Freelancers can register on their own or contracting with Training Companies. Many Training Companies make use of qualified Freelancers to deliver their services.

2.Become and Accredited Training Provider.

  • You must have at least one programme with that SETA Accredited in order to be an Accredited Training Provider
  • You need at least two different facilitators to offer each programme you want to offer + have “Scope” to train this. (US 117871 – Train the Trainer Certificates)
  • You need at least two different assessors to assess each programme you want to offer + have “Scope” to assess this. (US 115753 – Conduct Assessment Certificate)
  • You need at least two different moderators to moderate each programme you want to offer + have “Scope” to moderate this. (Us 115753 – Conduct Moderation Certificate) – Must obtain the Assessors Certificate before you can complete this programme.
  • The same facilitator and assessors can train and assess the same learner, but the moderator must be a different person.
  • Many companies get 2 x Facilitators and 2 x Assessors qualified and contract one of the Freelancers to perform the Moderation work.
  • The process to become an accredited  also required resources for example: Office, Qualified Staff, Computers, Tools or Venue to deliver the courses and a QMS policy. (Quality Management System  that can consist out of 6 to 12 different policies that explains how you will corporate)
  • Be registered with the DHET.

Personal Advice

We advice all new learners/people to start with the “US 115753” Conduct Assessment programme as this will provide you with an overview of the entire accreditation process.